Saturday, May 28, 2016

"Holiday" by Madonna

Song#:  1671
Date:  10/29/1983
Debut:  88
Peak:  16
Weeks:  21
Genre:  Dance-Pop



Pop Bits:  Madonna Louise Ciccone from Bay City, Michigan, would eventually become simply Madonna and take the world by storm. But before she was just Madonna, she began studying dance and ending up leaving the University of Michigan for the bright lights of NYC. Once there, she started working as a waitress while taking dance classes and getting opportunities to perform with dance companies and as a backing dancer for music artists. It was on one of her gigs as a backup dancer that she met Dan Gilroy. The two started a rock band called the Breakfast Club. Not long after, she left the band and with her boyfriend Stephen Bray formed Emmy. But it seemed that being in a band wasn't what she wanted and now that she was writing songs and getting more experience singing, Madonna wanted to move out on her own. Demos that she did with Bray got the attention of Sire Records and they signed her to a singles deal. Her first release was "Everybody" and that song became a Dance hit reaching #3, as did her next single "Burning Up." The results were good and Sire was ready to flip the bill for a full album. When it was mostly finished, Madonna was not fully pleased with the production of the tracks (done by Reggie Lucas), so she got her new boyfriend John "Jellybean" Benitez to step in and round out the production. In addition to remixing the existing tracks, Benitez fully produced a new song called "Holiday." It was selected as Madonna's third single and the first to fully represent her self-titled debut album. The song, which was paired with another track "Lucky Star," hit #1 on the Dance chart and soon it was climbing the Pop chart. It would peak in the Top 20 giving Madonna her first Pop hit.

ReduxReview:  I've been trying to think back to this time and how I felt about this song and this new Madonna singer. If I remember right, I kind of thought the song was slight and that she was a weak singer with a thin and whiny tone. She came off as some snotty youngster who woke up one day and thought "I think I wanna be a singer" and found a label that would select writers and producers to do all the work while she squeaked over the tracks. In other words, I wasn't impressed. In fact, I didn't buy one single from her debut album. I think I finally bought the LP after "Lucky Star" came out just so I could figure out what was going on with this singer. The LP didn't captivate me either, but there was something about Madonna that kept my attention. I wasn't sure what or why, but I had a distinct feeling I had misjudged her. Indeed I did and once "Like a Virgin" came out, it was all over. Instant Madonna fan. Later on, I was able to revisit her debut album and realize that for the most part, its a terrific album and the production is very clean and solid, especially on this track. It probably should have been a Top 10'er, but I'm not sure if folk were really ready to jump on the Madonna train yet.

ReduxRating:  8/10

Trivia:  While most songs were in place for her debut album, she still needed one more track to round out the album. She was supposed to record a song written by former bf Stephen Bray that had already been done in demo form called "Ain't No Big Deal." Unfortunately, conflicts with Bray and the song came about and Madonna was kept from recording it. Still needing a song, Benitez found this one written by two members of the post-disco group Pure Energy. Curtis Hudson and Lisa Stevens had shopped the song to several artists, but no one bit until Benitez took it to Madonna.Years later in 1997, Bray would include the demo of "Ain't No Big Deal" along with others that he did with Madonna (including demo versions of "Everybody" and "Burning Up") and release them a Pre-Madonna. The cash-in project, which Madonna didn't authorize, was considered an interesting curiosity at best and it disappeared quickly.

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Friday, May 27, 2016

"Lucky" by Eye to Eye

Song#:  1670
Date:  10/29/1983
Debut:  90
Peak:  88
Weeks:  2
Genre:  Soft Rock



Pop Bits:  With some positive results coming from their self-titled debut album ("Nice Girls," #37), the duo of Eye to Eye (Deborah Berg and Julian Marshall) were given the green light to do a second album for Warner Bros. Once again produced by Gary Katz (Steely Dan), Shakespeare Stole My Baby got released and this song was selected as the lead single. Unfortunately, it barely got off the ground and could only manage a couple of short weeks at the bottom of the chart. The lack of a hit basically killed the album and that ended the duo's major label days. Berg and Marshall would go on to other projects, but would reunite in 2005 for an indie LP.

ReduxReview:  This is an odd song. There really is no discernible chorus and it's kind of choppy with a different feel to each section. It's almost Frankenstein-stitched together. It flows fine, but I'd never in a million years say that this was single material.  Actually, I almost think this is ahead of its time. It reminds me of something that a wispy 90s singer like Lisa Loeb would do. It has a vibe more like that than an early 80s pop single. It's certainly an interesting song (as was their "Nice Girls"), but nothing that would get my attention if it came on the radio.

ReduxRating:  5/10

Trivia:  Deborah Berg continued in music and has released a couple of solo albums over the years. Along with doing songwriting workshops and private vocal lessons, she has collaborated with several artists and performed solo gigs. In addition to writing her own songs, she also co-wrote the theme to the PBS television series Great Museums. Julian Marshall moved on to be a session musician and producer, and for a time was an A&R person at Boulevard Records and Polydor UK. He later moved over into the teaching arena.

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Thursday, May 26, 2016

"No One Can Love You More Than Me" by Melissa Manchester

Song#:  1669
Date:  10/29/1983
Debut:  91
Peak:  78
Weeks:  4
Genre: Synthpop



Pop Bits:  A younger generation of music fans got to know Manchester through her 1982 Grammy-winning pop/dance hit "You Should Hear How She Talks About You," a song that was a step outside of the more adult-oriented tunes she was known for. Since it worked out so well, then obviously that is the type of music she should be making, right? So her label, Arista (aka Clive Davis), thought it best to keep pushing her down the dance diva road in order to keep Manchester's star bright and albums selling. Following a Greatest Hits package, her next LP, Emergency, was loaded with synthpop tracks that were geared to keep fans of "You Should" on board. This first single was issued, but it just didn't captivate listeners and it died off quickly after a month on the Pop chart (and #34 AC). A second single failed to reach any chart and that put the album in a tailspin. It was a definitive crash and burn and it brought to an end Manchester's days at Arista where she had been since her 1975 breakthrough album Melissa.

ReduxReview:  Here's the thing. I can see both side in this situation. I can understand where the label needed their artists to have hits in order to make money. Whether artists like it or not, once on a label, they are product. On the other hand, I can see how an artist would want to maintain control over their career and direction. It's a fine line. But in Manchester's case, while it was great to have a hit and a Grammy, she wasn't all that thrilled with doing the song in the first place and taking her career in that direction (it was all a fluke in my opinion anyway). So when it worked, of course the label would want more and I think they pushed her towards a sound/genre that was never in her wheelhouse. Here's an interesting fact - on her 1975 #12 album Melissa, she co-wrote nine out of the ten songs. On Emergency, three of ten. And the results speak for themselves. Arista pretty much sucked the musical life out of Manchester and it showed. What a waste. However, it all wasn't a complete loss. Along the way there were a few minor bright spots and this one had a little glimmer of life to it. Co-written by Terry Britten (of "What's Love Got to Do with It" fame) and Billy Livsey, it's actually a pretty good tune. I don't think it was catchy or memorable enough to really be a single (especially with the awkward title), but the song is one of Manchester's better efforts during this dreary phase of her career.

ReduxRating:  6/10

Trivia:  Manchester's reluctance to record "You Should Hear" wasn't the first time she had an issue with one of her hits. In 1978, Clive Davis heard tracks for Manchester's upcoming album that she titled Caravan. He didn't think there was a definitive hit to anchor the LP and that one was necessary. According to the song's producer, Harry Maslin, he was assigned to do the song "Don't Cry Out Loud" from Davis and get Manchester to record it. Apparently, she hated the song and was mad that she was forced to do it. However, from Manchester's angle, she was the one who brought the song to Davis. Co-written by Peter Allen and Carole Bayer Sager, Allen had done a gentle and subdued version of the song for an album and Manchester wanted to cover the tune in a similar fashion. Davis agreed that it would be great and a plan was set. However, when Manchester walked into the studio to do her vocal, the track had been rearranged and produced into an epic big ballad and Manchester was livid. Like she would later with "You Should Hear," she reluctantly went ahead and recorded the song. Clive then also renamed the album after the track despite Manchester's objections. The song was issued as a single and it hit #10 while the album went to #33.

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"Allies" by Heart

Song#:  1668
Date:  10/29/1983
Debut:  93
Peak:  83
Weeks:  4
Genre:  Rock



Pop Bits:  Heart's first single from their album Passionworks, "How Can I Refuse?," just missed the Top 40 getting to #44. Although it did reach #1 at Rock, the miss at Pop wasn't a great start and they hoped to turn things around with this second single. Unfortunately, it did far worse spending a short month hanging around the bottom of the chart. In doing so, it made the album their first to not generate at least one Top 40 Pop single. To make matters worse, the song couldn't even get on the Rock chart. The poor performing singles hampered albums sales and the best it could do was a #39 showing - their worst charting album to-date. It would also serve as their final album for Epic. The band was struggling with the label over lack of promotion and other issues. After Passionworks, it was time for Heart to move on to something new.

ReduxReview:  This is one of those odd songs where the verse sections are better than the chorus. Not that the chorus is bad, but the arrangement and melody within the verses are so good that when the chorus comes in, it's a bit of a let down. There is a nice build up to the chorus, but once it hits there's not much of a payoff. I wanted something like build-build-build>big!-big!-big!-triumphant!, but instead it's like build-build-build>bigish-low-low-low-eh. Even the bridge hints at building to something great and then it fizzles. Again, not bad, I just wanted more. All-in-all, it's still a quality track from Heart.

ReduxRating:  6/10

Trivia:   This song was written by Journey member Jonathan Cain. He wrote the tune for possible inclusion on Journey's LP Frontiers and recorded a demo. Apparently, Cain wanted to sing the song himself instead of front-man Steve Perry, but that wasn't flying with Perry. So Cain came up with a duet version for him and Perry, but it just didn't work. The song ended up getting set aside and ignored until Heart came along and gave it their attention.

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Wednesday, May 25, 2016

"Church of the Poisoned Mind" by Culture Club

Top 10 Alert!
Rated 10 Alert!
Song#:  1667
Date:  10/22/1983
Debut:  54
Peak:  10
Weeks:  17
Genre:  Pop, Blue-Eyed Soul



Pop Bits:  With three Top 10 hits from their debut album Kissing to Be Clever, Culture Club quickly became major stars with their flamboyant lead singer Boy George grabbing a lot of headlines. As with many artists who hit it big right out of the gate, pressure was on the band to prove they weren't just a gimmicky act with a couple of fluke hits. With hopes high, they emerged from the studio toting their second LP Colour By Numbers. To introduce the album, this first single was selected and released. In the UK, the song soared to #2 becoming their third Top 3 single there. In the US, the single got to #10, which was their fourth consecutive Top 10. The hit got them over the sophomore slump and even better results were to come.

ReduxReview:  Although I loved Culture Club's first singles, their debut album was just okay for me. It was likable, but I wasn't a big fan in any way. And then this single hit the airwaves. I devoured this slice of Motown pie like I had been starving for years. The groove was movin', the verse was great, Boy George was knockin' it out, and when Helen Terry (see below) chimed in, that was the cherry on the whipped creamed chorus. I absolutely loved it all and it still remains my favorite Culture Club song. Why the single only got to #10 is a mystery to me. I thought for sure it was headed to #1, which it really should have.

ReduxRating10/10

Trivia:  A highlight from this song was the background vocals provided by Helen Terry. Terry had already done some vocal work for Culture Club on their debut album after Boy George found her in a UK night club. Her role expanded on the band's second album with her vocals standing out on tracks like this single and "Black Money." A lot of attention and interest came her way, which prompted Terry to embark on a solo career. Her first single, "Love Lies Lost," a co-write with Boy George and Roy Hay, was issued in 1984 and went to #34 on the UK chart. Unfortunately, further singles and her lone album, 1986's Blue Notes, failed to establish her as a solo artist. Later, Terry switched careers from music to TV and film production. Most notably, she has been a producer (now executive producer) of the BRIT Awards show since 2001.

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"Why Me?" by Irene Cara

Song#:  1666
Date:  10/22/1983
Debut:  56
Peak:  13
Weeks:  15
Genre:  Synthpop, Dance



Pop Bits:  Cara hit it big early in 1983 with her #1 single "Flashdance...What a Feeling," the title song from the film Flashdance. It would be a gold record that would ultimately win a Grammy and an Oscar. Co-written by Cara, Keith Forsey and Giorgio Moroder (and produced by Moroder), the experience proved fruitful for all. Cara and Moroder then decided to continue their work relationship and set out to record tracks for Cara's next solo album. Titled What a Feelin', the album featured seven more tracks co-written by the pair along with the "Flashdance" title-track and three other new tunes with all but one track produced by Moroder. To kick off the album, this first single (co-written once again with Forsey) was selected for release. The song did well on the Dance chart getting to #7 and seemed like it was going to go Top 10 at Pop, but it stopped a bit shy at #13. It was still a good result and it gave Cara her fourth Top 20 entry.

ReduxReview:  The Cara/Moroder pairing worked so well that making an album together seemed like the logical next step and the results were quite good. This lead single, while no "Flashdance," was a nice chunk of synthpop/rock that probably should have just sneaked into the Top 10, but its #13 result was not bad at all. The only problem I have with the song is the album version of the tune, which goes on for a long time for no real reason. That probably should have been reserved for the dance mix. The single version is much more concise and easier to digest and it should have been on the album instead. Regardless, it's a good song and a worthy follow-up to "Flashdance."

ReduxRating:  7/10

Trivia:  Long before Cara's film and music career took off, she had a part in a children's television show. The Electric Company was a PBS program that began airing in 1971 and ran through 1977. Its cast featured legit stars like Bill Cosby and Rita Moreno, but also included a few soon-to-be stars like Morgan Freeman and Cara. For the show, Cara performed as part of a band called Short Circus. For the role, she took on the name Iris and performed on vocals and tambourine. She was with the show for two seasons before moving on to other projects.

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Tuesday, May 24, 2016

"In a Big Country" by Big Country

One-Hit Wonder Alert!
Song#:  1665
Date:  10/22/1983
Debut:  73
Peak:  17
Weeks:  15
Genre:  Rock



Pop Bits:  By 1981, this Scottish rock band had settled on a line-up and signed on to Mercury Records. Their first single, "Harvest Home," didn't make much of an impression, but their second single, "Fields of Fire (400 Miles)," took off and hit #10 on the UK chart. Their debut album The Crossing followed soon after and it became a platinum seller there reaching #3. The album's third single, which would reach #17 in the UK, would end up being the first issued in the US. The song's unique sound captivated US audiences and soon it was a #3 Rock track and a Top 20 Pop hit. The album also fared well in the States getting to #18 and going gold. Unfortunately, this would end up being their lone hit in the US and despite two other lower-charting singles, the band got tagged a one-hit wonder. They came in at #40 on VH1's list of the 100 greatest one-hit wonders.

ReduxReview:  Oh, that sound! It didn't take me long to get to the record store soon after I heard this track to buy the album. I was totally obsessed with it for quite a while and this track was certainly the highlight. The massive production was amazing and the guitars cooler than shit. I was at college when this came out (it was a music college) and I remember many folks trying to mimic the lead guitar sound. For a while, most anytime you walked into one of the local instrument shops, someone was playing around and trying to do that guitar line. The band kind of faded quickly in the US, which is too bad because they had some solid material on follow-up albums. Regardless, this song and album remain top favorites of mine from the decade.

ReduxRating:  9/10

Trivia:  The one thing from this single that caught everyone's ears was the instrument that sounded like bagpipes. You could tell it wasn't really bagpipes, but what was it? Turns out it was just a guitar. The band developed that sound using various effects and pedals. It's been mentioned (and even credited on the album) that an e-bow was used as well. The e-bow (short for electronic bow) was a handheld device used when playing the guitar that made the instrument sound more like strings or a synthesizer. However, it seems the e-bow was mainly used during the recording of the album for atmospherics and was not actually a part of creating the unique sound. In a live setting, the guitarist only uses the effects/pedals to achieve the bagpipe sound. It was key in making this single stand out and become a hit.

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"The Way He Makes Me Feel" by Barbra Streisand

Song#:  1664
Date:  10/22/1983
Debut:  80
Peak:  40
Weeks:  15
Genre:  Pop, Adult Contemporary, Soundtrack



Pop Bits:  Streisand's journey to make a film based on the short story "Yentl the Yeshiva Boy" by Isaac Bashevis Singer would end up taking almost fifteen years. After discovering the story, Streisand's original intent was to have the film be her follow-up to 1968's Funny Girl, but that didn't happen. In the years that followed, there were several attempts to get the project off the ground, but all eventually fell through. Finally, Streisand decided to take the reins and drive it to completion. As director, producer, star, and co-writer, Yentl began filming in 1982. Before the film was even finished, it became the butt of many jokes due to Streisand wearing several hats (including being a first-time director), the film being a musical (out of step with the times), the material (considered too ethnic to attract a big audience), and the fact she was a 40-year-old playing a much younger character. Despite the negative reactions, Streisand completed the film and in November of 1983 it began its initial limited run with positive results. By the time it opened nationwide in January, the musical was on its way to becoming a hit. The film was boosted by its musical score co-written by Streisand's muses, Marilyn and Alan Bergman (lyrics) and Michel Legrand (music). To help promote the upcoming film and soundtrack, this single was issued. It was one of two songs from the musical selected to get a pop overhaul in the studio. The more commercialized single version was a perfect fit for AC and it was an easy #1 on that chart. The mature ballad wasn't quite what the kids were into at the time and the best it could do was a very brief Top 40 showing at Pop. But thanks to the film being a hit, the album made it to #9 and became a platinum seller. On the downside, this remains Streisand's last solo Pop Top 40 single.

ReduxReview:  Like a lot of musicals, the songs for Yentl were meant to advance the story and not necessarily written to be commercial hits. So trying to retro-fit a song or two into something that could be played on the radio presented a challenge. However, I have to say that the arrangement done for this song was spot-on. It was beautifully done with a very sensual and romantic feel to it. This is opposed to the film version which plays more like an awakening than a sexy mood piece. The single was certainly perfect for AC and deservedly hit #1, but I can see how this adult-leaning tune was lost on a younger Pop audience. At least it did make the Top 40. Streisand's vocal performance is, as usual, remarkable. Sadly, she was snubbed by the Grammys on this one. However, the score did grab a nod for the Bergmans and Legrand.

ReduxRating:  9/10

Trivia:  With the film getting good reviews in its initial limited run, award nominations were sure to follow. The Golden Globes were the most generous handing out two awards from the film's five nominations. It won Best Picture, Musical or Comedy and Streisand won Best Director. She became the first female to win that award at the Golden Globes. The Oscars also gave the film five nominations. Amy Irving got a nod for Best Supporting Actress while the Bergmans and Legrand won the award for Best Original Song Score or Adaptation. Two songs from the film, this song and "Papa Can You Hear Me" were nominated in the Best Original Song category. Although the Globes welcomed Streisand's directorial debut, the Oscars were not as convinced leaving Streisand out of the running in the main categories. Despite the snub, Streisand's vision became a reality and was a success.

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Monday, May 23, 2016

"When the Lights Go Out" by Naked Eyes

Song#:  1663
Date:  10/22/1983
Debut:  85
Peak:  37
Weeks:  14
Genre:  Synthpop



Pop Bits:  With two hits under their belt from their self-titled debut album, "Always Something There to Remind Me" (#8) and "Promises, Promises" (#11), this British duo decided to go for a third and issued this next single. It wasn't as popular as the first two, but it did get them their third consecutive Top 40 entry. The album would do well enough to hit #32. All-in-all, it was a solid start to their career.

ReduxReview:  Although not nearly in the same class as their first two singles, this was still a solid tune from the band and its Top 40 showing is appropriate. It has a nice sophisticated pop feel that merged well with the blips and bleeps and other sounds from their fancy Fairlight machine. However, I think this song is actually better than what is heard on this recording. I bet the song would really benefit from a stripped down arrangement. Regardless, it is still a good entry in their catalog, if not too terribly memorable.

ReduxRating:  6/10

Trivia:  The duo's producer, Tony Mansfield, had some chart success of his own in the UK. In 1977, he co-founded the synthpop band New Musik. The group issued a debut album in 1980 titled From A to B. It reached #35 on the UK album chart thanks to four charting singles, the best being the #13 "Living By Numbers." Two more albums would follow, but they faded quickly and the band broke up. It was while in New Musik that Mansfield became quite familiar with the Fairlight sampling station and synth, which would be heavily used on Naked Eyes' debut.

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"I Am Love" by Jennifer Holliday

Song#:  1662
Date:  10/22/1983
Debut:  89
Peak:  49
Weeks:  11
Genre:  R&B



Pop Bits:  Success hit fast and hard for Broadway diva Jennifer Holliday. Along with her Tony-winning performance in the musical Dreamgirls, she grabbed an R&B #1 with a song from the show "And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going" (#22 Pop). With her popularity soaring, the time was ripe for her to try for a legit career as a recording artist. Signing with Geffen Records, the label that issued the Dreamgirls soundtrack, Holliday began work her debut solo album with Maurice White (of Earth, Wind & Fire fame) producing. Featuring songs by top-notch writers like White, David Foster, and Ashford & Simpson, hopes were high for the album to do well. Indeed it started off pretty good with this first single, which got to #2 at R&B. Unfortunately, it didn't get the traction it needed to climb the Pop chart and it slipped up just inside the Top 50. The album did fairly well (#6 R&B/#31 Pop) based on the hype and this single, but it wasn't the major hit that was expected. A second, more upbeat single titled "Just Let Me Wait" didn't do much to help the album when it stalled at #24 R&B.

ReduxReview:  Like a lot of people, I absolutely loved "And I Am Telling You" and when Holliday's debut album came out, I bought it without question. I have to say that it was quite disappointing. It was kind of all over the place. There was pop/dance, R&B grooves, AC, gospel, and, of course, this big theatrical ballad, which was clearly meant to mimic "And I Am Telling You," (which was oddly missing from the LP). I like this song, but I'm not so sure it was the right move to release another big diva ballad as her first official solo single. It kind of painted her into a corner. She needed a breakout tune that could really be a multi-format hit. A roaring upbeat dance song might have been better. Unfortunately, there was nothing on the album that was going to hit big, despite all the A-listers involved. It was mediocre material at best. It's a shame as Holliday deserved better. Regardless, this remains a nice tune that Holliday elevates to a higher level.

ReduxRating:  7/10

Trivia:  In addition to Holliday's Grammy win for Best R&B Vocal Performance on "And I Am Telling You," she also got a nomination for Best New Artist. That year, she was the only solo performer nominated. The balance of the nods went to band - Stray Cats, Men at Work, Human League, and Asia. Thanks to their double #1 singles and #1 album, Men at Work took home the trophy.

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Sunday, May 22, 2016

"Favorite Waste of Time" by Bette Midler

Song#:  1661
Date:  10/22/1983
Debut:  90
Peak:  78
Weeks:  4
Genre:  Pop, Rock



Pop Bits:  Midler's sixth studio album, No Frills, got off to a lackluster start when its first single, "All I Need to Know," only got to #77 Pop and #39 AC. She was looking to do better with this next single, but it did almost exactly the same on the Pop chart and disappeared after a month. Midler filmed her first MTV-style music video for this song, but even that didn't help the single do any better.

ReduxReview:  There are two things I don't get about this song. First, it's a mystery to me why Crenshaw (see below) didn't record it for his debut album and release it as a single, and second, when Midler did, why did it not catch on? I love this song and it seemed like a solid chart contender. Maybe not Top 10, but certainly Top 40 at minimum. Maybe the sound wasn't right for the time period or maybe folks were not liking Midler as a rocker. Perhaps it needed a different arrangement. Whatever it was, everyone missed out on a gem.

ReduxRating:  8/10

Trivia:  This is a remake of a song originally written and performed by Marshall Crenshaw. Although he did not include the song on his 1982 self-titled debut album, the demo version, titled "You're My Favorite Waste of Time," did become the b-side to his single "Someday, Someway" (#36 Pop/#25 Rock). Several other artists have recorded this song including Scottish singer Owen Paul. He hit #3 in the UK with his version in 1986. It was Paul's only hit and it got him tagged as a one-hit wonder there. Although the song and Paul are unfamiliar with US audiences, he did unwittingly play a role in a famous episode of a TV reality show. Anyone who watched or was even remotely familiar with the hit MTV reality show The Osbournes will certainly remember the episode when the family gets into a dispute with their neighbor over the loud music coming from the neighbor's backyard. It came to a head one evening when the neighbors began singing and playing songs outside in their backyard, which added fuel to the fire. It was at this point that Sharon Osbourne began launching food over the fence into their backyard including ham. The cops are called and come by, but after they leave Ozzy then throws a log over the fence, which smashes into something. And the cops return.. At the time no one knew who the neighbors were, but it was later revealed that it was Owen Paul, the Scottish one-hit wonder. Apparently his favorite waste of time was annoying the Osbournes and calling the cops.

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